Three Posing Techniques That Work For Me

I seem to get a lot of questions and compliments on how I pose my clients in photographs (which is awesome, amazing, and fantastic! Thank you!) I thought it would be fun to share my thought process behind my posing techniques and what works for me.

Two of the most important things to me, when photographing people, are 1.) to have my clients comfortable and 2.) to photograph them in their natural state, with their natural mannerisms, movements, and emotions. In order to do that, I need to help create that movement for them by giving them action items for each shot.

I will be sharing three posing techniques that I use to make my clients comfortable in front of the camera as well as capture them at their best. I am not saying this is the "be-all, end-all" of posing, but these three things work for me! 

  1. Incorporate action 

I love to give my clients something to do. This not only loosens them up and makes them look more natural, but it makes for some really fun, interesting shots. Here is an example from Matt & Lacy's engagement shoot last fall. 

Lacy LOVES to dance (and even owns her own dance studio in Paola & Louisburg). So, I wanted to incorporate some dance movement into their session. I had given them instruction to dance in front of this barn door in Weston.

Here are some of the images I was able to capture while they were having fun, doing something they love!

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Another example is from Kellan's senior session. He is a pitcher for Olathe East so I wanted to get some action shots of him pitching. These turned out to be some of my favorite images in my entire portfolio!

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Here is another example of an action shot. In this case, it was really cold outside and Danika needed to be doing something to keep her warm plus take her mind off of being cold (she was only four!) so I told her to start twirling around. This is the result. Love this image because it captures her personality SO well.

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      2. Incorporate props as needed

It is entirely up to you how many props you (and your clients) want to use in your photographs. Most of the time, when I am photographing adults, I try to stay away from props that look too "set up". I like to use props mostly when it is an aid to the action item I am giving my client (such as Kellan throwing the baseball) or important to the message of the photograph (example: having baby shoes in the photograph to announce a pregnancy). I do love it when clients show up with props, though. It sparks creativity especially for kids, toddlers, and babies. This is my ABSOLUTE favorite image and probably incorporates the most props which, is perfect

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      3. Photographing formal head shots 

If any of you have a mother like mine, she is going to want formal head shots. I always try to take at least a few standard photographs of my clients looking at the camera and smiling. Parents LOVE these. I know for me, I may LOVE all of the action photographs which incorporate movement and interesting angles but my mom will not put any of those on her mantle. She only wants formal head shots of everyone looking at the camera. So, I always try to offer those to my clients in addition to the fun action shots.

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I hope you all found this interesting and helpful! I thought it would be fun to share a little bit about my thought process behind posing my subjects as well as answer any questions you may have had about my strategy. ;)

All The Best,

MC